An ache

June 11, 2012

I went to the doctor’s today, to report an ache. The doctor prescribed some medicine. I went to the drug store, gave them the prescription, and told them I’d be back in 20 minutes. When I got back, the pharmacist said to me, “Oh, Mr. Gilbert, we need to ask you a question before filling out this prescription. Your insurance doesn’t cover this medication; are you sure you still want it?” I asked how much the medication cost; she said “Two fifty.” I said I could afford two fifty. When the cashier rang up the bill, I got out my two dollars and fifty cents. Then, as I began to contemplate the cashier’s quoting a somewhat longer figure, it dawned on me: the cost of the medication was $250.

Moral of the story: Don’t get sick.

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5 Responses to “An ache”

  1. Michaël de Verteuil Says:

    At least don’t get sick in the USA. I’m 53 and I don’t ever recall paying that much for prescription medication in Canada (though I am sure it must happen to some people). Wasn’t there a generic form your pharmacist could have proposed as a substitute, or was this one of those newfangled aches on which only the latest patented, non insurance-covered drugs have any effect? :-)

    Don’t mention generics to drug manufacturers. It breaks their little hearts.

  2. The Moron Says:

    As you prefer not to have politics on your site, I will not mention a political implication of your story that seems clear to to me, but only say that you are one of my favorite illustrators, and I hope your students benefitted from your drawing lessons.

    “Victuris” I take to be from victus, the noun not the past particple, but “pro postea” I don’t get–is pro a preposition and postea an adverb?

  3. bekkos Says:

    @ Michaël: I only have newfangled aches.

    @ The Moron: Actually, “victuris” is the future active participle (ablative plural) of vivo, to live. Pro postea victuris thus means, “for the sake of those who are going to live afterwards.”

  4. George Partlow Says:

    Yup: “for those who will live after” = “for posterity”

  5. The Moron Says:

    Ah. “Victus” can mean a living, as in to earn a living, so I thought you were saying something like, “for the living [on] afterwards”. Perhaps I do need to enroll in the Lyceum School outside Cleveland.


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