The original Greek of the following translation is available in Hugo Laemmer’s Scriptorum Graeciae Orthodoxae Bibliotheca Selecta, tomus primus (Freiburg-im-Breisgau, 1866), pp. 492-499.


Epigraph III

The following patristic citations give added confirmation to those citations which showed that the Spirit is from the Father, not in an unmediated way, but through the Son. For if the Spirit were from the Father without mediation, it would not have been said that the Son is the image of the Father, while the Spirit is the image of the Son; and, again, that the Son is [493] the energy and power of the Father, while the Spirit is the energy and power of the Son; and again, that the Son is the face of the Father, while the Spirit is the face of the Son.

St. Cyril, in his Dialogues with Hermias, book six, says:

“And in fact the divine David, knowing the Son to be the living and hypostatic energy and power of the Father, entreated saying: [494] ‘Command, O God, in thy power, confirm, O God, that which thou hast wrought in us.’ And the most wise Paul clearly proclaimed Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God.”
3:1 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, De SS. Trinitate dialogus vi; PG 75, 1049 C-D.

The same father, in one of the chapters of his Thesaurus, book two, says:

“The Holy Spirit is clearly shown to be, not foreign to the Son, but in him and from him, and like some natural energy, able to accomplish all things, as many as he desires.”
3:2 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, Thesaurus 34; PG 75, 581 C-D [=Bekkos, De unione 28, L297f.]

[495] The same father, in one of the chapters of his Thesaurus, book one, says:

“The Son is the living and substantial energy and power and wisdom of the Father.”
3:3 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, Thesaurus 32; PG 75, 520 A.

Athanasius the Great, in his Letter to Serapion, calls the Spirit “the energy of the Son.”
3:4 ❖ Athanasius of Alexandria, Epistola i ad Serapionem 20; PG 26, 580 A.

St. Cyril in his To Hermias, book five, says:

“For that the Son is, as it were, [496] the face of God the Father, the Psalmist easily would teach, when he says in one place: ‘Where shall I go from thy face, and from thy Spirit where shall I flee?’ And in another place again, as in the person of those who have put their trust in him: ‘The light of thy face has been signed upon us, O Lord.’ For we have been sealed with the Holy Spirit, unto likeness and resemblance with the face of the Father, that is to say, with the Son.”
3:5 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, De SS. Trinitate dialogus v; PG 75, 945 A.

[497] The same father, in his Exposition of the Gospel according to John, on the words, “That was the true light,” says:

“And, by all means, the face of God the Father, that is to say, the Son, bestows illumination upon creatures.”
3:6 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, In Joannis evangelium, lib. i, cap. 8; PG 73, 120 D (Bekkos has abridged the text).

The same father, on the text, “Labor not for the meat that perishes” (Jn 6:27), says:

“For they say that the face of God the Father is the Son, who is, [498] again, the character and the light that is from him, the grace which, through the Spirit, extends to the creature.”
3:7 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, In Joannis evangelium, lib. iii, cap. 5; PG 73, 485 B.

And a little after this:

“Since then the Son is confessedly the face of God the Father, he would also certainly be, in a way, the character [stamp, insignia] with which God seals.”
3:8 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, In Joannis evangelium, lib. iii, cap. 5; PG 73, 485 C.

[499] The same father, on the text, “But if not, believe on account of the works themselves” (Jn 14:11), says:

“For if the Son has filled the heavens and the ends of the earth, that is to say, as far as to Hades, why is it not most illogical to apply to him the name of circumscription, when they fail to bear in mind that if his face, i.e., the Spirit (for the Spirit is called the Son’s face), fills all things, how will he himself be confined within circumscription?”
3:9 ❖ Cyril of Alexandria, In Joannis evangelium, lib. ix, cap. 1; PG 74, 220 D – 221 A.

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